Lim Kit Siang, Lim Guan Eng, KEtua Pemuda Umno and the absence of christian apologists Lim Kit Siang and his ilk (including his son, Lim Guan Eng) will never fail us in delivering spiteful and racist festive messages promoting hate among the people of Malaysia. Lim Guan Eng in his infamous Wesak Day speech some time ago was even more acrimonious and vindictive. He seditiously tried to agitate the buddhists and the christians against the malays and muslims. Malicious people are incorrigible. Malaysia is truly unfortunate to have this father-son combo who preach fairness/equality and peace but in reality, a hypocritical duo of antagonists who will not hesitate to use religion, racism and dictatorial tactics just to attain and retain power. Compared to the Prime Minister’s Christmas message which are inclusive and even reconciliatory, Lim Kit Siang’s holiday message seemed to be a call to religious war of sorts.  Will Lim Kit Siang see the faint light at the end of the tunnel and change for the better in the twilight of his years? Don’t hold your breath. The Ketua Pemuda Umno too wrote a Christmas message in his facebook account. Although he claimed that it is not a standard christmas greeting by politicians, it is in fact a standard festive greeting usually written by malay apologists in web columns such as The Malaysian Insider. He wrote: This is not going to be a standard Christmas message. I thought this year, let’s not have someone draft the same generic message that politicians get their office to churn out year in, year out. I went to a Catholic primary school in Japan. Unlike most convent schools in Malaysia, my school was run by Canadian Catholic priests. Many of my teachers were priests. Brother Raymond, a tall, curly-haired Québécois was once such teacher who left an impression on me about hard work and fair play. Everyday we would begin school with prayer. For non-Christians like me we just bowed our head in silence out of respect while Christian students prayed. Sometimes I would recite the Al Fatihah quietly to myself. Sometimes I would just daydream. There was a crucifix in every classroom. Brother Raymond wore a big cross around his neck on a chain on top of his black clerical shirt. Many of my friends went for their Holy Communion and had their pictures taken for the yearbook. We all sang in a choir. When it came to Christmas, non-Christians also sang the non-religious songs. I think some even sang the religious songs but just kept quiet during certain lines! I went to my friends’ houses for Christmas. I was given presents. My parents were well prepared so I brought presents with me also to give to my hosts. None of this affected my own faith. My parents instilled in me a strong foundation in Islam. I led congregational prayers among my peers when I was small. I took part in Quran recitals organised by the embassy. Nothing I experienced at my Catholic school could undermine or shake my faith. The point of my brief recollection is this: have faith in your own faith. If your belief is strong, no one can make you lose your religion. And if you are sure of your own convictions, you will respect others even more. You won’t view them as a threat, as people secretly working to proselytise you. You might even learn from them as I did from Brother Raymond. To everyone celebrating, have a happy Christmas. What a touching christmas greeting. It is more of chastising the malay muslims here in Malaysia, rather than a direct message for the Christians here. Hence, due to his capacity as Ketua Pemuda Umno, he feels that it is his right to straighten his fellow muslims and therefore, a tacit apology for non-muslims for the behaviour of his fellow muslim brothers and sisters. In this regard since it is the Christmas period, the implied apology is for the christians. It is certainly not wrong to ask for forgiveness and extend the olive branch. Thank you Ketua Pemuda for apologising on our behalf. A liberal will always be an apologist for his race. Hopefully during Hari Raya Aidilfitri there will be christian politicians who will write in their Facebook like below. We have took the liberty to copy the Ketua Pemuda’s message and interchange certain keywords to fit the Hari Raya message appropriately: This is not going to be a standard Hari Raya message. I thought this year, let’s not have someone draft the same generic message that politicians get their office to churn out year in, year out. I went to a national primary school in Johor. Unlike most national schools in Malaysia, my school was run predominantly by malay muslims. Our headmaster was a strict ustaz. Many of my teachers were religious malay muslims. Cikgu Rizal, a tall, curly-haired malay was once such teacher who left an impression on me about hard work and fair play. Everyday we would begin school with prayer. For non-Muslims like me we just bowed our head in silence out of respect while muslim students prayed. Sometimes I would recite some psalms quietly to myself. Sometimes I would just daydream. There was an Allah inscription in every classroom. Cikgu Rizal wore a songkok and carries a small Yassin book whenever he goes. Many of my friends went for their Khatam Quran in the afternoon religious class and had their pictures taken for the yearbook. We all sang in a choir. When it came to Hari Raya, non-Muslims also sang the non-religious songs. I think some even sang the religious songs but just kept quiet during certain lines! I went to my friends’ houses for Hari Raya. I was given duit raya too and eat their Raya food. None of this affected my own faith. My parents instilled in me a strong foundation in Christianity. I attend mass on Sundays with my peers when I was small. I took part in catholic choirs organised by the local church. Nothing I experienced at my primary school could undermine or shake my faith. The point of my brief recollection is this: have faith in your own faith. If your belief is strong, no one can make you lose your religion. And if you are sure of your own convictions, you will respect others even more. You won’t view them as a threat, as people secretly working to undermine your religion. You might even learn from them as I did from Cikgu Rizal. To everyone celebrating, Selamat Hari Raya Aidifitri. Will Hannah Yeoh write something similar? Will Lim Guan Eng pose this kind of messages? For certain, only the malays are more tolerant and reconciliatory. Spiteful and racist politicians especially from DAP do not apologise for who they are.
source : jebat must die
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